Hand Bones | Carpal Bones

The Hand Bones know as The Carpel Bones

The hand consists of 54 bones separated into three distinct regions,

  • the wrist
  • the palm,
  • and the finger digits

The hand’s primary function is to allow the body to manipulate with its environment, such as grasping and touching objects.

 

Furthermore, the fingertips contain one of the most densest regions of nerve endings in the human body.

Below are detailed diagrams and descriptions of the hand bones (wrist, palm, and digits). Use the hand bones diagrams to learn about the hand bones and hand anatomy.

Carpal Wrist Bones

List of all Carpal (Wrist) Bones

 

  • A. Scaphoid (2)
  • B. Lunate (2)
  • C. Triquetral (2)
  • D. Pisiform (2)
  • E. Trapezium (2)
  • F. Trapezoid (2)
  • G. Capitate (2)
  • H. Hamate (2)
Metacarpal Bones

List of all Metacarpal Bones

 

  • metacarpal bones (5 × 2)
Phalanges Finger Bones

List of all Phalanges
(Digits / fingers of the hand)

 

  • proximal phalanges (5 × 2)
  • intermediate phalanges (4 × 2)
  • distal phalanges (5 × 2)

Carpal / Wrist Bones

Scaphoid bone

Click to Enlarge

Scaphoid

  • The scaphoid bone is one of the wrist bones, found in each hand.
  • The scaphoid bone is slightly larger than the other carpal bones and lies near the thumb.
  • It consists of seven surfaces: superior, inferior, dorsal, volar, lateral, medial, and distal convex surfaces.
  • The scaphoid plays an important role in wrist movement and support.

Interestingly, the scaphoid’s name is derived from the Greek word skaphe, meaning boat.

Lunate

Lunate bone

Click to Enlarge

The lunate bone, also known as the semilunar bone, is a crescent shaped bone of the wrist.

The lunate is found on each hand and thus accounts for 2 bones of the human body skeleton.

It lies between the scaphoid and triquertal bone and consists of six surfaces:

  • superior
  • inferior
  • dorsal
  • palmar
  • lateral
  • and medial surfaces

The lunate bone is one of the most frequently dislocated bones of the wrist region.

Additionally, the lunate bone’s name is derived from the latin word luna, meaning moon.

Triquetral

Triquetral bone

Click to Enlarge

  • The triquertal bone is one of the bones of the wrist or carpal region.
    This bone is found on each wrist and thus contributes to two bones of the human skeleton.
    The triquertal bone also has other names, such as triquetrum bone, three-cornered bone, pyramidal bone, and triangular bone.
    The bone is involved in motion and support.

Additionally, the triquertal bone consists of

  • the superior
  • inferior
  • volar,
  • lateral
  • and medial surfaces

Pisiform

Pisiform bone

Click to Enlarge

  • The pisiform bone, also known as the lentiform bone, is a small bone found in the wrist or carpal region.
  • Unlike many other carpal bones, the pisiform bone is a sesamoid bone since it is located within a tendon.
  • Like other carpal bones, the pisiform aids in motility and support.
  • The origin of the pisiform is the latin word pīsum, meaning “pea” since the pisiform is shaped somewhat like a pea.

Additionally, the pisiform bone consists of the dorsal, palmar, lateral, and medial surfaces. The pisiform is found in each wrist of the arm.

Trapezium

Trapezium bone

Click to Enlarge

  • The trapezium bone is a carpal bone and accounts for two bones of the human body skeleton.
  • This bone is quadrilateral in shape and like the other carpal bones, functions in motility and support.
  • The trapezium articulates with the scaphoid bone.

Additionally, the trapezium consists of

  • the superior
  • inferior
  • dorsal
  • palmar
  • lateral
  • and medical surfaces

The trapezium is also known as the greater multangular bone.

Trapezoid

Trapezoid bone

Click to Enlarge

  • The trapezoid bone is a wedge shaped bone located in the carpal or wrist region.
  • This bone is located in each wrist and thus accounts for two bones in the skeleton.

The trapezoid aids in motility of the hand and consists of

  • the superior
  • inferio
  • dorsal
  • palmar
  • lateral
  • and medial surfaces

Additionally the trapezoid bone is also known as the the lesser multangular bone and its name is derived from the Greek word trapezion, meaning irregular quadrilateral.

Capitate

Capitate bone

Click to Enlarge

  • The capitate bone is the largest bone of the wrist or carpal region and lies in the center of the wrist.
  • Like the other carpal bones, the capitate aids in hand mobility and support.

The capitate is found on each wrist and consists of 

  • the superior
  • inferior
  • dorsal
  • palmar
  • latera,
  • and medial surfaces

Additionally, the capitate bone’s name is derived from the Latin word capitātus, meaning “containing a head,” because the capitate contains a rounded surface known as the head.

Hamate

Hamate bone

Click to Enlarge

  • The hamate bone, also known as the unciform bone, is a wedge shaped bone located in the wrist.
  • This bone is found on each wrist and accounts for two bones in the human skeleton.

The hamate plays a role in hand movement and consists of the of

  • the superior,
  • inferior,
  • dorsal,
  • volar,
  • lateral,
  • and medial surfaces.

Often, the hamate bone fractures in sports related injuries.

Additionally, the hamate’s name is derived from the Latin word hamatus, meaning hooked.

Metacarpal Bones

Metacarpal Bones

  • Each hand consists of five metacarpal bones and thus the entire human skeleton consists of ten metacarpal bones.
  • The metacarpal bones are located in the metacarpus (palm region).
  • They lie in between the carpus and the phalanges (fingers).
  • The metacarpal bones primary functions include hand motion, hand support, and providing the shape of the hand. (Diagram of the metacarpal bones is  shown at the top of the page).

Phalanges

The Phalanges consist of three sections;

  • The proximal phalanges,
  • the intermediate phalanges,
  • and the distal phalanges.

Collectively, these bones make up the structure known as the fingers. (Diagram of the phalanges is  shown at the top of the page).

Proximal Phalanges

The proximal phalanges are found at the base of the fingers, closest to the carpus. These bones are longer than the carpal bones and play an important role in motion.

Intermediate Phalanges

The intermediate phalanges are found in between the proximal phalanges and distal phalanges.  There are four intermediate phalanges found on each hand, the only fingers that lacks the intermediate phalanges are the thumbs. Like the distal phalanges, the intermediate phalanges plays an important role in motion and support of the hand.

Distal Phalanges

The distal phalanges are a series of bones found at the tip of the hand, following the intermediate phalanges. The distal phalanges consists of five bones per hand and thus contribute a total of ten bones to the human skeleton. These bones play an important role in movement and functions of the hand.

The Hand Bones detailed above.

Comments are closed