Foot Bones | Anatomy of Foot

The Foot Bones and Anatomy of the Foot

  •  feet.

Below are detailed diagrams and descriptions of the foot bones. Use the foot bones diagrams to learn the names of the foot bones and foot anatomy.

Tarsal Bones

List of all Tarsal (Ankle) Bones

 

  • A. calcaneus (heel bone) (2)
  • B. talus (2)
  • C. cuboid bone (2)
  • D. navicular bone (2)
  • E. lateral cuneiform bone (2)
  • F. intermediate cuneiform bone (2)
  • G. medial cuneiform bone (2)
Metatarsal Bones

List of all Metatarsus Bones

 

  • metatarsal bone (5 × 2)
Foot Phalanges

List of all Digits of the feet (toe bones or phalanges):

 

  • proximal phalanges (5 × 2)
  • intermediate phalanges (4 × 2)
  • distal phalanges (5 × 2)

Tarsal / Ankle Bones

The tarsal bones are a series of bones that make up the region known as the tarsus, or more commonly known as the ankle.

Calcaneus (Heel Bone)

Calcaneus bone

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  • The calcaneus bone, also known as the heel bone, is the largest bone of the tarsal or ankle region.
  • The calcaneus also constitutes the region known as the heel.
  • This bone is very important in movement of the foot and support of the body.

Additionally, the calcaneus consists of important structures, such as the Achilles tendon, tarsal sinus, and the tuber calcanei.

Talus

Talus bone

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  • The talus bone, also known as the astragalus, is an irregularly shaped bone of the tarsal or ankle region.
  • This is the second largest of the ankle bones and forms part of the ankle joint.
  • The talus functions in allowing motion of the foot and transfers the body’s weight to the foot.

Additionally, the talus is divided into three regions: the head, neck, and body.

Cuboid

Cuboid bone

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  • The cuboid bone is one of the several bones found in the tarsal or ankle region.
  • This bone is found in each ankle and thus contributes two bones to the human skeleton.
  • The function of the cuboid is support of the body’s weight, locomotion, and maintaining lateral foot stability.

Additionally, the cuboid bone forms part of many joints in the foot, such as the tarsometatarsal and calcaneocuboid joints.

Navicular

Navicular bone

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  • The navicular bone is one of the bones of the tarsal or ankle region.
  • This bone is found in each ankle and contributes two bones to the human body skeleton.
  • The navicular is a relatively small bone that plays a function in locomotion and body support.
  • It touches five other bones: the three cuneiform bones, the talus bone, and the cuboid bone.

Additionally, the navicular resembles a boat due to its concavity.

Lateral Cuneiform

Lateral cuneiform bone

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  • The lateral cuneiform bones are two bones of the tarsal or ankle regions in the human skeleton.
  • The lateral cuneiform is a wedge shaped bone located in between the intermediate cuneiform and cuboid bones.
  • Like the other tarsal bones, the lateral cuneiform plays a role in motion and support.

Furthermore, the lateral cuneiform is also known as the third cuneiform or external cuneiform.

Intermediate Cuneiform

Intermediate cuneiform bone

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  • The intermediate cuneiform bone is located in the ankle region of the skeleton.
  • This bone is found in each tarsus / ankle and thus contributes two bones to the human body skeleton.
  • The intermediate cuneiform is wedge shaped and is also known as the second cuneiform bone or middle cuneiform bone.
  • The bone plays a role in movement and support of the body.

Medial Cuneiform

Medial cuneiform bone

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  • The medial cuneiform, also known as the first cuneiform, is a bone found in the tarsus or ankle region.
  • The medial cuneiform is found in each ankle and thus two medial cuneiform bones are found in the entire human skeleton.
  • Like other tarsal bones, this bone plays a role in motion and support of the body.

Additionally, the medial cuneiform touches four other bones: the intermediate cuneiform bone, the navicular, and two metatarsal bones.

Metatarsal Bones

Metatarsal Bones

  • Each foot consists of five metacarpal bones and thus the entire human skeleton consists of ten metatarsal bones.
  • The metatarsal bones are located between the tarsus and the phalanges (toes).
  • The metatarsal bones’ primary functions include foot motion, body support, and providing the shape of the foot. (Diagram of the metatarsal bones is  shown at the top of the page).

Phalanges

The Phalanges consist of three sections.

  • The proximal phalanges,
  • the intermediate phalanges,
  • and the distal phalanges.

Collectively, these bones make up the structure known as the toes. (Diagram of the phalanges is shown at the top of the page).

Proximal Phalanges

The proximal phalanges are found at the base of the toes, closest to the tarsus. These bones are longer than the play an important role in movement of the foot.

Intermediate Phalanges

  • The intermediate phalanges are found in between the proximal phalanges and distal phalanges.
  • There are four intermediate phalanges found on each foot, the only toes that lacks the intermediate phalanges are the thumbs.
  • Like the distal phalanges, the intermediate phalanges plays an important role in motion of the foot.

Distal Phalanges

  • The distal phalanges are a series of bones found at the tip of the foot, following the intermediate phalanges.
  • The distal phalanges consists of five bones per foot and thus contribute a total of ten bones to the human skeleton.
  • These bones play an important role in movement of the foot.

The anatomy of Foot Bones.

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